Publications

Books

  • Gergel, S. E. and M. G. Turner, editors. 2002. Learning landscape ecology: a practical guide to concepts and techniques. Springer-Verlag, New York.
  • Gergel, S. E. and M. G. Turner, editors. 2017. Learning landscape ecology: a practical guide to concepts and techniques, 2nd edition. Springer, New York.
  • Lovett, G. M., C. G. Jones, M. G. Turner and K. C. Weathers, editors. 2005. Ecosystem function in heterogeneous landscapes. Springer-Verlag, New York.
  • Turner, M. G., editor. 1987. Landscape heterogeneity and disturbance. Springer-Verlag, New York.
  • Turner, M. G. and R. H. Gardner, editors. 1991. Quantitative methods in landscape ecology. Springer-Verlag, New York.
  • Turner, M. G., R. H. Gardner and R. V. O’Neill. 2001. Landscape ecology in theory and practice. Springer-Verlag, New York.
  • Turner, M. G. and R. H. Gardner. 2015. Landscape ecology in theory and practice, 2nd edition. Springer, New York.
  • Wiens, J. A., M. R. Moss, M. G. Turner and D. J. Mladenoff, editors. 2007. Foundation papers in landscape ecology. Columbia University Press, New York.

Peer reviewed journal articles

2022  2021  2020  2019  2018  2017  2016  2015  2014  2013  2012  2011  2010  2009  2008  2007  2006  2005  2004  2003  2002  2001  2000  1999  1998  1997  1996  1995  1994  1993  1992  1991  1990  1989  1988  1987  1985  1984  1983

In press

  • Kucharik, C. J., E. G. Booth, S. P. Loheide III, R. Power, A. R. Rissman, J. Seifert, and M. G. Turner. Building food-energy-water resilience requires avoiding unintended consequences for ecosystems. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment (In press).

2022

  1. Braziunas, K. H., D. Abendroth, and M. G. Turner. 2022. Young forests and fire: Using lidar-imagery fusion to explore fuels and burn severity in a subalpine forest reburn. Ecosphere 13:e4096.
  2. Cleveland, C. C., C. R. G. Reis, S. S. Perakis, K. A. Dynarksi, S. A. Batterman, T. E. Crews, M. Gei, M. J. Gundale, D. N. L. Menge, M. B. Peoples, S. C. Reed, V. G. Salmon, F. M. Soper, B. N. Taylor, M. G. Turner, and N. Wurzburger. 2022. Exploring the role of cryptic nitrogen fixers in terrestrial ecosystems: A frontier in nitrogen cycling research. Ecosystems 25.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10021-022-00804-2.
  3. Gill*, N. S., M. G. Turner*, C. D. Brown, S. I Glassman, S. L. Haire, W. D. Hansen, E. R. Pansing, S. B. St. Clair, and D. F. Tomback. 2022. Limitations to propagule dispersal will constrain post-fire recovery of plants and fungi in many western coniferous forests. *Co-leaders. BioScience 72:347-364.
  4. Hoecker, T. J., and M. G. Turner. 2022. A short-interval reburn catalyzes departures from historical structure and composition in a mesic mixed-conifer forest. Forest Ecology and Management 504:119814.
  5. Hoecker, T. J., and M. G. Turner. 2022. Combined effects of climate and fire-driven vegetation change constrain the distributions of forest vertebrates during the 21st century. Diversity and Distributions 28:727-744.
  6. Kiel, N. G., and M. G. Turner. 2022. Where are the trees? Extent, configuration and drivers of poor forest recovery 30 years after the 1988 Yellowstone Fires. Forest Ecology and Management 524:120536.
  7. Kucharik, C. J., E. G. Booth, S. P. Loheide III, R. Power, A. R. Rissman, J. Seifert, and M. G. Turner. Building food-energy-water resilience requires avoiding unintended consequences for ecosystems. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment (In press).
  8. Seidl, R. and M. G. Turner. 2022. Post-disturbance reorganization of forest ecosystems in a changing world. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 119(28): e220219119.
  9. Turner, M. G., K. H. Braziunas, W. D. Hansen, T. J. Hoecker, W. Rammer, Z. Ratajczak, A. L. Westerling, and R. Seidl. 2022. The magnitude, direction and tempo of forest change in Greater Yellowstone in a warmer world with more fire. Ecological Monographs 92(1):e01485.

2021

  1. Braziunas, K. H., R. Seidl, W. Rammer, and M. G. Turner. 2021. Can we manage a future with more fire? Effectiveness of defensible space treatment depends on housing amount and configuration. Landscape Ecology 36:309-330.
  2. Gill, N. S., T. J. Hoecker, and M. G. Turner. 2021. The propagule doesn’t fall far from the tree, especially after short-interval fire. Ecology 102(1):e03194.
  3. Pellegrini, A. F. A., T. Refsland, C. Averill, C. Terrer, A. C. Staver, D. G. Brockway, A. Caprio, W. Clatterbuck, C. Coetsee, J. D. Haywood, S. E. Hobbie, W. A. Hoffman, J. Kush, T. Lewis, W. K. Moser, S. T. Overby, B. Patterson, K. G. Peay, P. B. Reich, C. Ryan, M. A. S. Sayer, B. C. Scharenbroch, T. Schoennagel, G. R. Smith, K. Stephan, C. Swanston, M. G. Turner, T. M. Varner, and R. B. Jackson. 2021. Decadal changes in fire frequencies shift tree communities and functional traits. Nature Ecology & Evolution 5(4). DOI: 10.1038/s41559-021-01401-7
  4. Qiu, J., C. Queiroz, E. M. Bennett, A. F. Cord, E. Crouzat, S. Lavorel, J. Maes, M. Meacham, A. V. Norstrom, G. D. Peterson, R. Seppelt, and M. G. Turner. 2021. Land-use intensity mediates ecosystem service tradeoffs across regional social-ecological systems. Ecosystems and People 17:264-278.
  5. Rammer, W., K. H. Braziunas, W. D. Hansen, Z. Ratajczak, A. L. Westerling, M. G. Turner, and R. Seidl. 2021. Widespread regeneration failure in forests of Greater Yellowstone under scenarios of future climate and fire. Global Change Biology 27:4339-4351.
  6. Ziter, C., B. M. Herrick, M. R. Johnston, and M. G. Turner. 2021. Ready, set, go: Community science field campaign reveals habitat preferences of non-native Asian earthworms in an urban landscape. BioScience 71:280-291.

2020

  1. Albrich, K., W. Rammer, M. G. Turner, Z. Ratajczak, K. H. Braziunas, W. D. Hansen, and R. Seidl. 2020. Simulating forest resilience: a review. Global Ecology and Biogeography 29(12): 2082-2096.
  2. Hansen, W. D., D. Abendroth, W. Rammer, R. Seidl, and M. G. Turner. 2020. Can wildland fire management alter 21st-century fire patterns and forests in Grand Teton National Park? Ecological Applications 30(2), e02030.
  3. Hoecker, T. J., W. D. Hansen, and M. G. Turner. 2020. Landscape position amplifies consequences of novel short-interval stand-replacing fires on postfire tree establishment in subalpine conifer forests. Forest Ecology and Management 478:118523. doi: 10.1016/j.foreco.2020.118523
  4. Kucharik, C. J., T. Ramiadantsoa, J. Zhang, and A. R. Ives. 2020. Spatiotemporal trends in crop yields, yield variability, and yield gaps across the USA. Crop Science 60(4):2085–2101.
  5. Malhi, Y., J. Franklin, N. Seddon, M. Solan, M. G. Turner, C. B. Field, and N. Knowlton. 2020. Climate change and ecosystems: threats, opportunities and solutions. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 375:20190104.
  6. McDowell, N. G., C. D. Allen, K. Anderson-Teixeira, B. H. Aukema, B. Bond-Lamberty, J. S. Clark, M. Dietze, C. Grossiord, A. Hanbury-Brown, R. B. Jackson, D. J. Johnson, L. Kueppers, J. W. Lichstein, K. Ogle, B. Poulter, R. Seidl, M. G. Turner, M. Uriarte, A. P. Walker, and C. Xu. 2020. Pervasive shifts in forest dynamics in a changing world. Science 368:1-10 (eaaz9463).
  7. Turner, M. G., W. J. Calder, G. S. Cumming, T. P. Hughes, A. Jentsch, S. L. LaDeau, T. M. Lenton, B. N Shuman, M. R. Turetsky, Z. Ratajczak, J. W. Williams, A. P. Williams, and S. R. Carpenter. 2020. Climate change, ecosystems, and abrupt change: science priorities. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 375:20190105.

2019

  1. Hansen, W. D., and M. G. Turner. 2019. Origins of abrupt change? Postfire subalpine conifer regeneration declines nonlinearly with warming and drying. Ecological Monographs 89(1), e01340.
  2. Higuera, P. E., A. L. Metcalf, C. Miller, B. Buma, D. B. McWethy, E. C. Metcalf, Z. Ratajczak, C. R. Nelson, B. C. Chaffin, R. C. Stedman, S. McCaffrey, T. Schoennagel, B. J. Harvey, S. M. Hood, C. A. Schultz, A. E. Black, D. Campbell, J. H. Haggerty, R. E. Keane, M. A. Krawchuk, J. C. Kulig, R. Rafferty, and A. Virapongse. 2019. Integrating subjective and objective dimensions of resilience in fire-prone landscapes. BioScience 69(5):379-388.
  3. McWethy, D. B., T. Schoennagel, P. E. Higuera, M. Krawchuk, B. J. Harvey, E. C. Metcalf, C. Schultz, C. Miller, A. L. Metcalf, B. Buma, A. Virapongse, J. C. Kulig, R. C. Stedman, Z. Ratajczak, C. R. Nelson, and C. Kolden. 2019. Rethinking resilience to wildfire. Nature Sustainability. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41893-019-0353-8
  4. Motew, M., X. Chen, S. R. Carpenter, E. G. Booth, J. Seifert, J. Qiu, S. P. Loheide, M. G. Turner, S. C. Zipper, and C. J. Kucharik. 2019. Comparing the effects of climate and land use on surface water quality using future watershed scenarios. Science of the Total Environment 693(2019):133484.
  5. Ramiadantsoa, T., M. A. Stegner, J. W. Williams, and A. R. Ives. 2019. The potential role of intrinsic processes in generating abrupt and quasi-synchronous tree declines during the Holocene. Ecology 100(2):e02579. 10.1002/ecy.2579
  6. Stegner, M. A., Z. Ratajczak, S. R. Carpenter, and J. W. Williams. 2019. Inferring critical transitions in paleoecological time series with irregular sampling and variable time-averaging. Quaternary Science Reviews 207:49-63.
  7. Stegner, M. A., M. G. Turner, V. Iglesias, and C. Whitlock. 2019. Post-fire vegetation and climate dynamics in low-elevation forests over the last three millennia in Yellowstone National Park. Ecography 42:1–11.
  8. Turner, M. G., T. G. Whitby, and W. H. Romme. 2019. Feast not famine: Nitrogen pools recover rapidly in 25-yr-old postfire lodgepole pine. Ecology 100(3):e02626.
  9. Turner, M. G., K. H. Braziunas, W. D. Hansen, and B. J. Harvey. 2019. Short-interval fire erodes the resilience of subalpine lodgepole pine forests. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 116:11319-11328.
  10. Ziter, C., E. J. Pederson, C. J. Kucharik, and M. G. Turner. 2019. Reply to Drescher: Interdisciplinary collaboration is essential to understand and implement climate-resilience strategies in cities. (Letter) Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 116:26155-26156.
  11. Ziter, C. D., E. J. Pedersen, C. J. Kucharik, and M. G. Turner. 2019. Scale-dependent interactions between tree canopy cover and impervious surfaces reduce daytime urban heat during summer. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 116:7575-7580.
  12. Ziter, C., and M. G. Turner. 2019. No evidence of co-facilitation between a non-native Asian earthworm (Amynthas tokioensis) and invasive common buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica) in experimental mesocosms. Biological Invasions 21:111-122.

2018

  1. Braziunas, K. H., W. D. Hansen, R. Seidl, W. Rammer, and M. G. Turner. 2018. Looking beyond the mean: Drivers of variability in postfire stand development of conifers in Greater Yellowstone. Forest Ecology and Management 430:460-471. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2018.08.034
  2. Frock C. F. and M. G. Turner. Microhabitat conditions and landscape pattern explain nocturnal rodent activity, but not seed removal, in burned and unburned lodgepole pine forests. Landscape Ecology 11:1895-1909. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10980-018-0717-x
  3. Graves, R. A., S. M. Pearson and M. G. Turner. 2018. Effects of bird community dynamics on the seasonal distribution of cultural ecosystem services. Ambio https://doi.org/10.1007/s13280-018-1068-1.
  4. Hansen, W. D., K. H. Braziunas, W. Rammer, R. Seidl, and M. G. Turner. 2018. It takes a few to tango: changing climate and fire regimes can cause regeneration failure of two subalpine conifers. Ecology 99:966-977.
  5. Hansen, W. D., J. P. Scholl, A. E. Sorensen, K. E. Fisher, J. A. Klassen, L. Calle, G. S. Kandlikar, N. Kortessis, D. C. Kucera, D. E. Marias, D. L. Narango, K. O’Keeffe, W. Recart, E. Ridolfi, and M. E. Shea. 2018. How do we ensure the future of our discipline is vibrant? Student reflections on careers and culture of ecology. Ecosphere 9: e02099.
  6. Morris, J. L., S. Cottrell, C. J. Fettig, R. J. DeRose, K. M. Mattor, V. A. Carter, J. Clear, J. Clement, W. D. Hansen, J. A. Hicke, P. E. Higuera, A. W. R. Seddon, H. Seppa, R. L. Sherriff, J. D. Stednick, and S. J. Seybold. 2018. Bark beetles as agents of change in social-ecological systems. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 16: S34-S43.
  7. Qiu, J., S. R. Carpenter, E. G. Booth, M. Motew, S. C. Zipper, C. J. Kucharik, S. P. Loheide III, and M. G. Turner. 2018. Understanding relationships among ecosystem services across spatial scales and over time. Environmental Research Letters 054020:1-15.
  8. Qiu, J., S. R. Carpenter, E. Booth, M. Motew, S. Zipper, C. Kucharik, X. Chen, S. Loheide, J. Seifert, and M. G. Turner. 2018. Scenarios reveal pathways to sustain future ecosystem services in an agricultural landscape. Ecological Applications 28:119-134.
  9. Ratajczak, Z., S. R. Carpenter, A. R. Ives, C. J. Kucharik, T. Ramiadantsoa, M. A. Stegner, J. W. Williams, J. Zhang, and M. G. Turner. 2018. Abrupt change in ecological systems: inference and diagnosis. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 33(7):513-526.
  10. Sommerfeld, A., C. Senf, B. Buma, A. W. D’Amato, T. Després, I. Díaz-Hormazábal, S. Fraver, L. E. Frelich, Á. G. Gutiérrez, S. J. Hart, B. J. Harvey, H. S. He, T. Hlásny, A. Holz, T. Kitzberger, D. Kulakowski, D. Lindenmayer, A. S. Mori, J. Müller, J. Paritsis, G. L. W. Perry, S. L. Stephens, M. Svoboda, M. G. Turner, T. T. Veblen, and R. Seidl. 2018. Patterns and drivers of recent disturbances across the temperate forest biome. Nature communications 9(1): 4355.
  11. Uhrin, A. V., and M. G. Turner. 2018. Physical drivers of seagrass spatial configuration: the role of thresholds. Landscape Ecology 33:2253-2272.
  12. Ziter, C., and M. G. Turner. 2018. Current and historical land use influence soil-based ecosystem service supply in an urban landscape. Ecological Applications 28 (3):643-654. https://doi.org/10.1002/eap.1689

2017

  1. Cardille, J. A. and M. G. Turner. 2017. Understanding landscape metrics. Pages 45-64 in S. E. Gergel and M. G. Turner, editors. Learning landscape ecology, 2nd edition. Springer, New York.
  2. Cardille, J. A. and M. G. Turner. 2017. Regional and continental perspectives on landscape pattern. Pages 157-174 in S. E. Gergel and M. G. Turner, editors. Learning landscape ecology, 2nd edition. Springer, New York.
  3. Graves, R. A., S. M. Pearson, and M. G. Turner. 2017. Landscape dynamics of floral resources affect the supply of a biodiversity-dependent cultural ecosystem service. Landscape Ecology 32:415–428.
  4. Graves, R. A., S. M. Pearson, and M. G. Turner. 2017. Species richness alone does not predict cultural ecosystem service value. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 114(14): 3774–3779.
  5. Nelson, K. N., M. G. Turner, W. H. Romme, and D. B. Tinker. 2017. Simulated fire behaviour in young, postfire lodgepole pine forests. International Journal of Wildland Fire 26(10):852-865.
  6. Qiu, J., C. B. Wardropper, A. R. Rissman, and M. G. Turner. 2017. Spatial fit between water quality policies and hydrologic ecosystem services in an urbanizing agricultural landscape. Landscape Ecology 32:59–75.
  7. Qiu, J. and M. G. Turner. 2017. Effects of non-native earthworm invasion on temperate forests and prairies in the Midwestern US. Biological Invasions 19:73–88.
  8. Rieb, J. T., R. Chaplin-Kramer, G. C. Daily, E. M. Bennett, P. R. Armsworth, K. Böhning-Gaese, A. Bonn, G. S. Cumming, F. Eigenbrod, V. Grimm, B. M. Jackson, A. Marques, S. K. Pattanayak, H. M. Pereira, G. D. Peterson, T. H. Ricketts, B. E. Robinson, M. Schröter, L. A. Schulte-Moore, R. Seppelt, and M. G. Turner. Science to target investments in nature. BioScience 67(9):820-833.
  9. Rose, K. C., S. R. Greb, M. Diebel, and M. G. Turner. 2017. Annual precipitation as a regulator of spatial and temporal drivers of lake water clarity. Ecological Applications 27:632-643.
  10. Rose, K. C., R. A. Graves, W. D. Hansen, B. J. Harvey, J. Qiu, S. A. Wood, C. Ziter, and M. G. Turner. 2017. Historical foundations and future directions in macrosystems ecology. Ecology Letters 20: 147–157.
  11. Schoennagel, T., J. Balch, H. Brenkert-Smith, P. Dennison, B. Harvey, M. Krawchuk, N. Miekiewicz, P. Morgan, M. Moritz, R. Rasker, M. G. Turner, and C. Whitlock. 2017. Adapt to more wildfire in western North American forests as climate changes. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Perspective) 114(18): 4582–4590.
  12. Spake, R., R. Lasseur, E. Crouzat, E. Bennett, J. Maes, M. Mulligan, M. Mouchet, G. Peterson, C. J. E. Schulp, W. Thuiller, M. G. Turner, P. H. Verburg, K. Parks, M. Schaafsma, J. M. Bullock, S. Lavorel, and F. Eigenbrod. Unpacking ecosystem service bundles: towards predictive mapping of synergies and trade-offs between ecosystem services. Global Environmental Change 47:37-50.
  13. Turner, M. G. and M. Simard. 2017. Using spatial statistics and landscape metrics to compare disturbance mosaics. Pages 175-190 in S. E. Gergel and M. G. Turner, editors. Learning landscape ecology, 2nd edition. Springer, New York.
  14. Ziter, C., R. A. Graves, and M. G. Turner. 2017. How do land-use legacies affect ecosystem services in United States cultural landscapes? Landscape Ecology 32(11):2205–2218. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10980-017-0545-4.

2016

  1. Blank, P. J., C. L. Williams, D. W. Sample, T. D. Meehan, and M. G. Turner. 2016. Alternative scenarios of bioenergy crop production in an agricultural landscape and implications for bird communities. Ecological Applications 26(1):42-54.
  2. Booth, E. G., Qiu, J., Carpenter, S. R., Schatz, J., Chen, X., Kucharik, C. J., Loheide, S. P., Motew, M. M., Seifert, J. M. and Turner, M. G. 2016. From qualitative to quantitative environmental scenarios: Translating storylines into biophysical modeling inputs at the watershed scale. Environmental Modelling & Software 85:80-97.
  3. Donato, D. C., B. J. Harvey, and M. G. Turner. 2016. Regeneration of lower-montane forests a quarter-century after the 1988 Yellowstone Fires: a fire-catalyzed shift in lower treelines? Ecosphere 7(8):e01410.
  4. Graves, R. A., S. M. Pearson, and M. G. Turner. 2016. Landscape patterns of bioenergy production in a changing climate: implications for crop allocation and land-use competition. Ecological Applications 26:515-529.
  5. Hansen, W. D., W. H. Romme, A. Ba, and M. G. Turner. 2016. Shifting ecological filters mediate postfire expansion of seedling aspen (Populus tremuloides) in Yellowstone. Forest Ecology and Management 362:218-230.
  6. Hansen, W.D., F.S. Chapin III, H.T. Naughton, T.S. Rupp, and D. Verbyla. 2016. Forest-landscape structure mediates effects of a spruce bark beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis) outbreak on subsequent likelihood of burning in Alaskan boreal forest. Forest Ecology and Management 369:38-46.
  7. Harvey, B. J., D. C. Donato and M. G. Turner. 2016. High and dry: post-fire tree seedling establishment in subalpine forests decreases with post-fire drought and large stand-replacing burn patches. Global Ecology and Biogeography 25:655–669.
  8. Harvey, B. J., D. C. Donato, and M. G. Turner. 2016. Drivers and trends in spatial patterns of burn severity in forests of the US Northern Rocky Mountains (1984-2010). Landscape Ecology 31:2367–2383.
  9. Harvey, B. J., D. C. Donato, and M. G. Turner. 2016. Burn me twice, shame on who? Interactions between successive forest fires across a temperate mountain region. Ecology 97(9): 2272-2282.
  10. Johnstone, J. F., C. D. Allen, J. F. Franklin, L. E. Frelich, B. J. Harvey, P. E. Higuera, M. C. Mack, R. K. Meentemeyer, M. R. Metz, G. L. W. Perry, T. Schoennagel, and M. G. Turner. 2016. Changing disturbance regimes, ecological memory, and forest resilience. (*Johnstone and Turner co-led this manuscript). Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 14(7): 369–378.
  11. Nelson, K. N., M. G. Turner, W. H. Romme, and D. B. Tinker. 2016. Landscape variation in tree regeneration and snag fall drive fuel loads in 24-yr old post-fire lodgepole pine forests. Ecological Applications 26(8):2424–2438.
  12. Romme, W. H., T. G. Whitby, D. B. Tinker, and M. G. Turner. 2016. Deterministic and stochastic processes lead to divergence in plant communities during the first 25 years after the 1988 Yellowstone Fires. Ecological Monographs 86(3):327-351.
  13. Seidl R., D. C. Donato, K. F. Raffa, and M. G. Turner. 2016. Spatial variability in tree regeneration after wildfire delays and dampens future bark beetle outbreaks. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 113(46):13075–13080.
  14. Turner, M. G., T. G. Whitby, D. B. Tinker, and W. H. Romme. 2016. Twenty-four years after the Yellowstone Fires: Are postfire lodgepole pine stands converging in structure and function? Ecology 97(5):1260-1273.
  15. Turner, M. G., D. C. Donato, W. D. Hansen, B. J. Harvey, W. H. Romme, and A. L. Westerling. 2016. Climate change and novel disturbance regimes in national park landscapes. Pages 77-101 In: S. R. Beissinger, D. D. Ackerly, H. Doremus, and G. Machlis, editors. Science, conservation, and national parks. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL.
  16. Uhrin, A. V., P. A. Townsend. 2016. Improved seagrass mapping using linear spectral unmixing of aerial photographs. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science 171:11-22.
  17. Uhrin, A. V. 2016. Tropical cyclones, derelict traps, and the future of the Florida Keys commercial spiny lobster fishery. Marine Policy 69:84–91.
  18. Usinowicz, J., Qiu, J., and Kamarainen, A. 2016. Flashiness and flooding of two lakes in the Upper Midwest during a century of urbanization and climate change. Ecosystems DOI:10.1007/s10021-016-0042-7.
  19. Zipper, S. C.*, Qiu, J*. and Kucharik, C. J. 2016. Drought effects on US maize and soybean production: spatiotemporal patterns and historical changes. Environmental Research Letters 11(9):094021. *Both authors contributed equally to this work and share first authorship.
  20. Ziter, C. 2016. The biodiversity-ecosystem service relationship in urban areas: a quantitative review. Oikos 125:761–768.

2015

  1. Carpenter, S.R., E.G. Booth, S. Gillon, C.J. Kucharik, S. Loheide, A.S. Mase, M. Motew, J. Qiu, A.R. Rissman, J. Seifert, E. Soylu, M.G. Turner, and C.B. Wardropper. 2015. Plausible futures of a social-ecological system: Yahara Watershed, Wisconsin, USA. Ecology and Society 20 (2): 10.
  2. Chapin, F.S, III, S.T.A. Pickett, M.E. Power, S.L. Collins, J.S. Baron, D.W. Inouye, and M.G. Turner. 2015. Earth Stewardship: An initiative by the Ecological Society of America to foster engagement to sustain Planet Earth. Pages 173-194 in: Earth Stewardship: Linking Ecology and Ethics in Theory and Practice. Rozzi, R., F.S. Chapin III, J.B. Callicott, S.T.A. Pickett, M.E. Power, J.J. Armsto, and R.H. May, Jr., editors. Springer, New York.
  3. Qiu, J. and M. G. Turner. 2015. Importance of landscape heterogeneity in sustaining hydrologic ecosystem services in an agricultural watershed. Ecosphere 6(11)229.
  4. Qiu, J. 2015. A global synthesis of the effects of biological invasions on greenhouse gas emissions. Global Ecology and Biogeography 24(11):1351–1362.
  5. Record, S., P. F. B. Ferguson, E. Benveniste, R. A. Graves, V. W. Pfeiffer, M. Romolini, C. E. Yorke, and B. Beardmore. 2015. Graduate students navigating social-ecological research: insights from the Long-Term Ecological Research Network. Ecology and Society 21(1):7.
  6. Romme, W. H. and M. G. Turner. 2015. Ecological implications of climate change in Yellowstone: moving into uncharted territory? Yellowstone Science 23(1):6-13.
  7. Small, D. M., P. J. Blank, and B. Lohr. 2015. Habitat use and movement patterns by dependent and independent juvenile Grasshopper Sparrows during the post-fledging period. Journal Field Ornithology 86(1):17-26.
  8. Turner, M. G. 2015. Twenty-five years of US landscape ecology: looking back and forging ahead. Pages 43-54 In: G. W. Barrett, T. Barrett and J. Wu, editors. History of landscape ecology in the United States. Springer, New York.

2014

  1. Blank, P. J., D. W. Sample, C. Williams and M. G. Turner. 2014. Bird communities and biomass yields in potential bioenergy grasslands. PLoS ONE 9(10)e109989.
  2. Chen, J., R. John, G. Sun, S. McNulty, A. Noormets, J. Xiao, M. G. Turner and J. F. Franklin. 2014. Carbon fluxes and storages in forests and landscapes. Pages 139-166 In: J. C., Azevedo, A. Perera and M.A. Pinto (Eds.) Forest landscapes and global change: challenges for research and management. Springer, New York.
  3. Harvey, B.J., D.C. Donato and M.G. Turner. 2014. Recent mountain pine beetle outbreaks, wildfire severity, and postfire tree regeneration in the US Northern Rockies. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Early Edition).
  4. Harvey, B.J., D. C. Donato, W. H. Romme and M. G. Turner. 2014. Fire severity and tree regeneration following bark beetle outbreaks: the role of outbreak stage and burning conditions. Ecological Applications 24(7): 1608-1625.
  5. Jackson, M. M., S. M. Pearson and M. G. Turner. 2014. Effects of stand age, logging roads, and elevation on pollinator communities in southern Appalachian forests. Southeastern Naturalist 13:317-336.
  6. Westerling, A. L., T. Brown, T. Schoennagel, T. Swetnam, M. G. Turner, and T. T. Veblen. 2014. Climate and wildfire in western US forests. In: A. Sample, P. Bixler and C. Miler, eds. Forest conservation and management in the Anthropocene. University Press of Colorado.
  7. Jackson, M. M., S. M. Pearson and M. G. Turner. 2014. Effects of stand age, logging roads, and elevation on pollinator communities in southern Appalachian forests. Southeastern Naturalist 13:317-336.

2013

  1. Anderson, D. P., M. G. Turner, S. M. Pearson, T. P. Albright, R. K. Peet and A. Wieben. 2013. Predicting Microstegium vimineum invasion in natural plant communities of the southern Blue Ridge Mountains, USA. Biological Invasions15:1217–1230.
  2. Donato, D. C., B. J. Harvey, M. Simard, W. H. Romme and M. G. Turner. 2013. Bark beetle effects on fuel profiles across a range of stand structures in Douglas-fir forests of Greater Yellowstone, USA. Ecological Applications 23:3–20.
  3. Donato, D. C., M. Simard, W. H. Romme, B. J. Harvey and M. G. Turner. 2013. Evaluating post-outbreak management effects on future fuel profiles and stand structure in bark beetle-impacts forests of Greater Yellowstone. Forest Ecology and Management 303:160-174.
  4. Franks, S., J. G. Masek and M. G. Turner. 2013. Monitoring forest regrowth following large scale fire using satellite data—A case study of Yellowstone National Park. Submitted to European Journal of Remote Sensing 46:xxx-xxx, DOI: 10.5721/EuJRS201346xx.
  5. Griffin, J. M., M. Simard and M. G. Turner. 2013. Salvage harvest effects on advance tree regeneration, soil nitrogen, and fuels following mountain pine beetle outbreak in lodgepole pine. Forest Ecology and Management 291:228–239.
  6. Harvey, B. J., D. C. Donato, W. H. Romme and M. G. Turner. 2013. Influence of recent bark beetle outbreak on wildfire severity and post-fire tree regeneration in montane Douglas-fir forests. Ecology 94:2465-2486.
  7. Jackson, M. M., S. M. Pearson and M. G. Turner. 2013. Performance and population dynamics of a native understory herb differ between young and old forest stands in the Southern Appalachians. Forest Ecology and Management 304:444–454.
  8. Kashian, D. M., W. H. Romme, D. B. Tinker, M. G. Turner and M. G. Ryan. 2013. Post-fire changes in forest carbon storage over a 300-year chronosequence of Pinus contorta-dominated forests. Ecological Monographs 83:49–66.
  9. Kuhman, T. R., S. M. Pearson and M. G. Turner. 2013. Why does land-use history facilitate non-native plant invasion? A field experiment with Celastrus orbiculatus. Biological Invasions 15:613–626.
  10. Lumpkin, H. A. and S. M. Pearson. 2013. Effects of exurban development and temperature on bird species in the southern Appalachians. Conservation Biology, 27:1069–1078.
  11. Qiu, J. and M. G. Turner. 2013. Spatial interactions among ecosystem services in an urbanizing agricultural watershed. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 110:12149–12154.
  12. Stephens, S. L., J. K. Agee, P. Z. Fulé, M. P. North, W. H. Romme, T. W. Swetnam and M. G. Turner. 2013. Managing forests and fire in changing climates. Science 342:41-42.
  13. Turner, M. G., D. C. Donato and W. H. Romme. 2013. Consequences of spatial heterogeneity for ecosystem services in changing forest landscapes: priorities for future research. Landscape Ecology 28:1081–1097.

2012

  1. Donato D.C. and S.H. Timme. 2012. A method for surfacing large log cross-sections in preparation for scanning and cross-dating. Tree-Ring Research 68:115-119.
  2. Griffin, J. M. and M. G. Turner. 2012. Bark beetle outbreak induces similar changes to the nitrogen cycle in contrasting conifer forests. Oecologia 170:551-565.
  3. Jackson, M. M., M. G. Turner, S. M. Pearson and A. R. Ives. 2012. Seeing the forest and the trees: multilevel models reveal both species and community patterns. Ecosphere 3:79.
  4. Lumpkin, H. A., S. M. Pearson and M. G. Turner. 2012. Climate and exurban development affect nest predation and nest predator presence in the Southern Appalachians. Conservation Biology 26:679-688.
  5. Simard, M., E. N. Powell, K. F. Raffa and M. G. Turner. 2012. What explains landscape patterns of tree mortality caused by bark beetle outbreaks in Greater Yellowstone? Global Ecology and Biogeography 21:556-567.
  6. Simard, M., W. H. Romme, J. M. Griffin and M. G. Turner. 2012. Do mountain pine beetle outbreaks change the probability of active crown fire in lodgepole pine forests? Reply. Ecology 93:946-950.
  7. Smithwick, E. A. H., K. J. Naithani, T. C. Balser, W. H. Romme and M. G. Turner. 2012. Post-fire spatial patterns of soil nitrogen mineralization and microbial abundance. PLoS ONE 7(11):e50597.

2011

  1. Albright, T. P., M. G. Turner and J. A. Cardille. 2011. Characterizing spatial pattern in biogeographic data. Pages 419-434 In: A. C. Millington, M. Blumler and U. Schickhoff, editors. The SAGE Handbook of Biogeography. Sage Publications Ltd., London.
  2. Buffam, I., M. G. Turner, A. Desai, P. J. Hanson, J. Rusak, N. Lottig and S. R. Carpenter. 2011. Integrating aquatic and terrestrial components to construct a complete carbon budget for a north temperate lake district. Global Change Biology 17:1193-1211.
  3. Griffin, J. M., M. G. Turner and M. Simard. 2011. Nitrogen cycling following mountain pine beetle disturbance in lodgepole pine forests of Greater Yellowstone. Submitted to Forest Ecology & Management 261:1077-1089.
  4. Kuhman T. R., S. M. Pearson and M. G. Turner. 2011. Agricultural land-use history increases non-native plant invasion in a Southern Appalachian forest a century after abandonment. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 41:920-929.
  5. Remsburg, A. J. 2011. Relative influence of prior life stages and habitat variables on dragonfly (Odonata: Gomphiade) densities among lake sites. Diversity 3:200-216.
  6. Romme, W. H., M. S. Boyce, R. E. Gresswell, E. H. Merrill, G. W. Minshall, C. Whitlock and M. G. Turner. 2011. Twenty years after the 1988 Yellowstone fires: lessons about disturbance and ecosystems. Ecosystems 14:1196-1215.
  7. Simard, M., W. H. Romme, J. M. Griffin and M. G. Turner. 2011. Do mountain pine beetle outbreaks change the probability of active crown fire in lodgepole pine forests? Ecological Monographs 81:3-24.
  8. Smithwick, E. A. H., A. L. Westerling, M. G. Turner, W. H. Romme, M. G. Ryan. 2011. Vulnerability of landscape carbon fluxes to future climate and fire in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Pages 131-134 In: C. Anderson, ed. Questioning Greater Yellowstone’s Future: Climate, Land Use, and Invasive Species. Proc. 10th Biennial Scientific Conference on the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Yellowstone National Park, WY, and Laramie, WY: Yellowstone Center for Resources and University of Wyoming William D. Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources.
  9. Turner, M. G., W. H. Romme, E. A. H. Smithwick, D. B. Tinker, and J. Zhu. 2011. Variation in aboveground cover influences soil nitrogen availability at fine spatial scales following severe fire in subalpine conifer forests. Ecosystems 14:1081-1095.
  10. Westerling, A. L., M. G. Turner, E. A. H. Smithwick, W. H. Romme and M. G. Ryan. 2011. Continued warming could transform Greater Yellowstone fire regimes by mid-21st century. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1110199108.

2010

  1. Albright, T. P., D. P. Anderson, N. S. Keuler, S. M. Pearson and M. G. Turner. 2010. The spatial legacy of introduction: Celastrus orbiculatus in the southern Appalachians, USA. Journal of Applied Ecology 46:1229-1236.
  2. Albright, T. P., H. Chen, L. Chen, and Q. Guo. 2010. The ecological niche and reciprocal prediction of the disjunct distribution of an invasive species: the example of Ailanthus altissima. Biological Invasions 12:2413-2427.
  3. Buffam, I., S.R. Carpenter, W. Yeck, P.C. Hanson, and M.G. Turner. 2010. Filling holes in regional carbon budgets: predicting peat depth in a north-temperate lake district. Journal of Geophysical Research 115, G01005, DOI:10.1029/2009JG001034.
  4. Gleick, P. J., et. al. 2010. Climate change and the integrity of science. Science 328:689-690. (Letter)
  5. Kuhman, T. R., S. M. Pearson and M. G. Turner. 2010. Effects of land-use history and the contemporary landscape on non-native plant invasion at local and regional scales in the forest-dominated southern Appalachians. Landscape Ecology 25:1433-1445.
  6. Predick, K. I. and E. H. Stanley. 2010. Influence of vegetation and seasonal flow patterns on parafluvial nitrogen retention in a 7th-order river. Journal of the North American Benthological Society 29:904-917.
  7. Turner, M. G. 2010. Disturbance and landscape dynamics in a changing world. Ecology 91: 2833 – 2849.

2009

  1. Cardille, J. A., S. R. Carpenter, J. A. Foley, P. C. Hanson, M. G. Turner and J. A. Vano. 2009. Climate change and lakes: estimating sensitivities of water and carbon budgets. Journal of Geophysical Research. Vol. 114 G03011, DOI:10.1029/2008JG000891
  2. Fraterrigo, J. M., S. M. Pearson and M. G. Turner. 2009. The response of understory herbaceous plants to nitrogen fertilization in forests of different land-use history. Forest Ecology and Management 257:2182-2188.
  3. Fraterrigo, J. M., S. M. Pearson and M. G. Turner. 2009. Joint effects of habitat configuration and temporal stochasticity on population dynamics. Landscape Ecology 24:863-877.
  4. Marburg, A. E., S. B. Bassak, T. K. Kratz and M. G. Turner. 2009. The demography of coarse wood in north-temperate lakes. Freshwater Biology 54:1110-1119.
  5. Predick, K. I., S. E. Gergel and M. G. Turner. 2009. Effect of flood regime on tree growth in the floodplain and surrounding uplands of the Wisconsin River. River Research and Applications 25:283-296.
  6. Remsburg, A. J. and M. G. Turner. 2009. Aquatic and terrestrial drivers of dragonfly (order Odonata) assemblages within and among north-temperate lakes. Journal of the North American Benthological Society 28:44-56.
  7. Romme, W. H., D. B. Tinker, G. H. Stakes, and M. G. Turner. 2009. Does inorganic nitrogen availability limit plant growth 3-5 years after fire in a Wyoming lodgepole pine forest? Forest Ecology & Management 257:829-835.
  8. Smithwick, E. A. H., M. G. Ryan, D. M. Kashian, W. H. Romme, D. B. Tinker and M. G. Turner. 2009. Modeling the effects of fire and climate change on carbon and nitrogen storage in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) stands. Global Change Biology 15:535-548.
  9. Smithwick, E. A. H., D. M. Kashian, M. G. Ryan and M. G. Turner. 2009. Long-term ecosystem nitrogen storage and soil nitrogen availability in post-fire lodgepole pine ecosystems. Ecosystems 12:792-806.
  10. Turner, M. G., E. A. H. Smithwick, D. B. Tinker and W. H. Romme. 2009. Variation in foliar nitrogen and aboveground net primary production in young postfire lodgepole pine. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 39:1024-1035.

2008

  1. Anderson, D. P., J. D. Forester, and M. G. Turner. 2008. When to slow down? Elk residence rates on an heterogeneous landscape. Journal of Mammalogy 89(1):105–114.
  2. Forester, J. D., D. P. Anderson and M. G. Turner. 2008. Landscape and local factors affecting northern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis) recruitment in the Chequamegon National Forest, Wisconsin (USA). American Midland Naturalist 160:438-453.
  3. Henning, B. M. and A. J. Remsburg. 2008. Lakeshore vegetation effects on avian and anuran populations. American Midland Naturalist 161:123-133.
  4. Metzger, K. l., E. A. H. Smithwick, D. B. Tinker, W. H. Romme, T.C. Balser, and M. G. Turner. 2008. Influence of coarse wood and pine saplings on nitrogen mineralization and microbial communities in young post-fire Pinus contorta. Forest Ecology and Management 256:59-67.
  5. Moore, S., T. Wallington, R. Hobbs, P. Ehrlich, C. S. Holling, S. Levin, D. Lindenmeyer, C. Pahl-Wostl, H. Possingham, M. Turner and M. Westoby. 2008. Diversity in current ecological thinking: implications for environmental management. Environmental Management, DOI: 10.1007/s00267-008-9187-2.
  6. Predick, K. I. and M. G. Turner. 2008. Landscape configuration and flood frequency influence invasive shrubs of the floodplain forest of the Wisconsin River (USA). Journal of Ecology 96:91-102.
  7. Raffa, K. F., B. H. Aukema, B. J. Bentz, A. L. Carroll, J. A. Hicke, M. G. Turner and W. H. Romme. 2008. Cross-scale drivers of natural disturbances prone to anthropogenic amplification: dynamics of biome-wide bark beetle eruptions. BioScience 58(6):501-517.
  8. Remsburg, A. J., A. C. Olson, and M. J. Samways. 2008. Shade alone reduces adult dragonfly (Odonata : Libellulidae) abundance. Journal of Insect Behavior 21: 460-468.
  9. Schoennagel, T., E. A. H. Smithwick and M. G. Turner. 2008. Landscape heterogeneity following large fires: insights from Yellowstone National Park, USA. International Journal of Wildland Fire 17:742-753.
  10. Turner, M. G., E. H. Stanley, M. Bürgi and D. J. Mladenoff. 2008. Changes in the Wisconsin River and its floodplain. Pages 229-249 In: D. M. Waller and T. P. Rooney, editors. The vanishing present. Wisconsin’s changing lands, waters and wildlife. University of Chicago Press.

2007

  1. Agrawal, A. A., D. D. Ackerly, F. Adler, B. Arnold, C. Caceres, D. F. Doak, E. Post, P. Hudson, J. Maron, K. A. Mooney, M. Power, D. Schemske, J. Stachowica, S. Strauss, M. G. Turner, E. Werner. 2007. Filling key gaps in population and community ecology. Front Ecol Environ 5(3): 145–152.
  2. Cardille, J. A., Carpenter, S. R., Coe, M. T., Hanson, P. R., Foley, J. A., Turner, M. G., and J. A. Vano. 2007. Carbon and water cycling in lake-rich landscapes: landscape connections, lake hydrology and biogeochemistry. Journal of Geophysical Research 112, G02031, DOI:10.1029/2006JG000200.
  3. Carpenter, S.R., B.J. Benson, R. Biggs, J.W. Chipman, J.A. Foley, S.A. Golding, R.B. Hammer, P.C. Hanson, P.T.J. Johnson, A.M. Kamarainen, T.K. Kratz, R.C. Lathrop, K.D. McMahon, B. Provencher, J.A. Rusak, C.T. Solomon, E.H. Stanley, M.G. Turner, M.J. Vander Zanden, C.-H. Wu and H. Yuan. 2007. Understanding regional change: comparison of two lake districts. BioScience 57(4):323-335.
  4. Forester, J. D., A. R. Ives, M. G. Turner, D. P. Anderson, D. Fortin, H. Beyer, D. W. Smith and M. S. Boyce. 2007. State-space models link elk movement patterns to landscape characteristics in Yellowstone National Park. Ecological Monographs 77(2):285-299.
  5. Forester, J. D., D. P. Anderson and M. G. Turner. 2007. Do high density patches of coarse wood and regenerating sapling create browsing refugia for aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) in Yellowstone National Park (USA)? Forest Ecology and Management 253: 211-219.
  6. Hanson, P. C., S. R. Carpenter, J. A. Cardille, M. T. Coe, and L. A. Winslow. 2007. Small lakes dominate a random sample of regional lake characteristics. Freshwater Biology 52: 814-822.
  7. Peters, D. P. C., B.T. Bestelmeyer and M.G. Turner. 2007. Cross-scale interactions and changing pattern-process relationships: consequences for system dynamics. Ecosystems 10: 790-796.
  8. Roth, B. M., I. C. Kaplan, G. G. Sass, P. T. Johnson, A. E. Marburg, A. C. Yannarell, T. D. Havlicek, T. V. Willis, M. G. Turner and S. R. Carpenter. 2007. Linking terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems: the role of coarse wood in lake food webs. Ecological Modelling 203: 439-452.
  9. Turner, M. G. and J. A. Cardille. 2007. Spatial heterogeneity and ecosystem processes. Pages 62-77 in: J. Wu and R. J. Hobbs, editors. Key topics in landscape ecology. Cambridge University Press.
  10. Turner, M. G., D. M. Turner, W. H. Romme and D. B. Tinker. 2007. Cone production in young post-fire Pinus contorta stands in Greater Yellowstone (USA). Forest Ecology and Management 242:119-206.
  11. Turner, M. G., E. A. H. Smithwick, K. L. Metzger, D. B. Tinker and W. H. Romme. 2007. Inorganic nitrogen availability following severe stand-replacing fire in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 104:4782-4789.

2006

  1. Dixon, M. D. and M. G. Turner. 2006. Simulated recruitment of riparian trees and shrubs under natural and regulated flow regimes on the Wisconsin River, USA. River Research and Applications 22: 1057-1083.
  2. Fraterrigo, J. M., M. G. Turner, and S. M. Pearson. 2006. Interactions between past land use, life-history traits and understory spatial heterogeneity. Landscape Ecology 21:777Ð790.
  3. Fraterrigo, J. M., M. G. Turner and S. M. Pearson. 2006. Previous land use alters plant allocation and growth in forest herbs. Journal of Ecology 94: 548-557.
  4. Fraterrigo, J. M., T. C. Balser and M. G. Turner. 2006. Microbial community variation and its relationship with nitrogen mineralization in historically altered forests. Ecology 87:570-579
  5. Groffman, P. M., J. S. Baron, T. Blett, A. J. Gold, I. Goodman, L. H. Gunderson, B. M. Levinson, M. A. Palmer, H. W. Paerl, G. D. Peterson, N. L. Poff, D. W. Rejeski, J. F. Reynolds, M. G. Turner, K. C. Weathers, and J.A. Wiens. 2006. Ecological thresholds: The key to successful environmental management or an important concept with no practical application? Ecosystems 9:1-13.
  6. Kashian, D.M., W.H. Romme, D.B. Tinker, M.G. Turner, and M.G. Ryan. 2006. Carbon storage on landscapes with stand-replacing fires. BioScience 56(7):598-606.
  7. Marburg, A. E., M. G. Turner and T. K. Kratz. 2006. Natural and anthropogenic variation in coarse wood among and within lakes. Journal of Ecology 94:558-568.
  8. Metzger, K. L., W. H. Romme and M. G. Turner. 2006. Foliar nitrogen patterns following stand-replacing fire in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) forests in the Rocky Mountains, USA. Forest Ecology and Management 227(1-2):22-30.
  9. Remsburg, A. J. and M. G. Turner. 2006. Amount, position and age of coarse wood influence litter decomposition in young post-fire Pinus contorta stands. Can. J. For. Res. 36(9): 2112-2123.
  10. Sass, G. G., J. F. Kitchell, S. R. Carpenter, T. R. Hrabik, A. E. Marburg, and M. G. Turner. 2006. Fish community and food web responses to a whole-lake removal of coarse woody habitat. Fisheries 31(7): 321-330.
  11. Schoennagel. T., M. G. Turner, D. M. Kashian and A. Fall. 2006. Influence of fire regimes on lodgepole pine stand age and density across the Yellowstone National Park (USA) landscape. Landscape Ecology 21:1281-1296.

2005

  1. Anderson, D.P., J. D. Forester, M. G. Turner, J. L. Frair, E. H. Merrill, D. Haydon, D. Fortin, J. S. Mao, M. S. Boyce, J. Fryxell, and H. Beyer. 2005.  Factors influencing female home-range sizes in elk (Cervus elaphus ) in North American landscapes. Landscape Ecology 20:257-271.
  2. Anderson, D. P., M. G. Turner, J. D. Forester, J. Zhu, M. S. Boyce, H. Beyer and L. Stowell. 2005. Scale-dependent summer resource selection by reintroduced elk in Wisconsin, USA. Journal of Wildlife Management 69:298-310.
  3. Cardille, J. A., M. G. Turner, M. Clayton, S. Price, and S. E. Gergel. 2005. METALAND: Characterizing spatial patterns and statistical context of landscape metrics. BioScience 55:983-988.
  4. Forshay, K. J., H. N. Morzaria-Luna, B. Hale, and K. Predick. 2005. Landowner satisfaction with the wetlands reserve program in Wisconsin. Environmental Management 36(2): 248-257.
  5. Fraterrigo, J. M., M. G. Turner, S. M. Pearson, and P. Dixon. 2005. Effects of past land use on spatial heterogeneity of soil nutrients in Southern Appalachian forests. Ecological Monographs 75:215-230.
  6. Gergel, S. E., S. R. Carpenter and E. H. Stanley. 2005. Do dams and levees impact nitrogen cycling? Simulating the effects of flood alterations on floodplain denitrification. Global Change Biology 11(8):1352-1367.
  7. Hale, B. W., M. M. Steen-Adams, K. Predick and N. Fisher. 2005. Ecological conservation through aesthetic landscape planning: a case study of the Lower Wisconsin State Riverway. Environmental Management 35(4): 381-395.
  8. Kashian, D. M., M. G. Turner, and W.H. Romme. 2005. Variability in leaf area and stemwood increment along a 300-year lodgepone pine chronosequence. Ecosystems 8:48-61.
  9. Kashian, D. M., M. G. Turner, W. H. Romme and C. J. Lorimer. 2005. Variability and convergence in stand structural ddevelopment on a fire-dominated sub-alpine landscape. Ecology 86:643-654.
  10. Palmer, M.A., E. Bernhardt, E. Chornesky, S.L. Collins, A. Dobson, C. Duke, B. Gold, R. Jacobson, S. Kingsland, R. Kranz, M. Mappin, M.L. Martinez, F. Micheli, J. Morse, M. Pace, M. Pascual, S. Palumbi, J. Reichman, A. Townsend, M. G. Turner. 2005. Ecological science and sustainability for the 21st Century. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 3:4-11.
  11. Romme, W. H., M. G. Turner, G. A. Tuskan and R. A. Reed. 2005. Establishment, persistence and growth of aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings in Yellowstone National Park. Ecology 86:404-418.
  12. Smithwick, E. A. H., M. C. Mack, M. G. Turner, F. S. Chapin III, and T. C. Balser. 2005. Spatial heterogeneity and soil nitrogen dynamics in a burned black spruce forest stand: distinct controls at different scales. Biogeochemistry 76:517-537.
  13. Smithwick, E. A. H., M. G. Turner, K. L. Metzger, and T. C. Balser. 2005. Variation in NH4+ mineralization and microbial communities with stand age in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forests, Yellowstone National Park (USA). Soil Biology and Biogeochemistry 37:1546-1559.
  14. Smithwick, E. A. H., M. G. Turner, M. C. Mack, and F. S. Chapin, III. 2005. Post-fire soil N cycling in northern conifer forests affected by severe, stand-replacing wildfires. Ecosystems 8:163-181.
  15. Turner, M. G. 2005. Landscape ecology in North America: past, present and future. Ecology 86:1967-1974.
  16. Turner, M. G. 2005. Landscape ecology: what is the state of the science? Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution and Systematics 36:319-344.
  17. Turner, M. G. and F. S. Chapin, III. 2005. Causes and consequences of spatial heterogeneity in ecosystem function. Pages 9-30 in: G. M. Lovett, C. G. Jones, M. G. Turner, and K. C. Weathers, editors. Ecosystem function in heterogeneous landscapes. Springer-Verlag, New York.
  18. Turner, M. G. and S. R. Carpenter. 2005. Challenges for riparian science. Page 16 In: Naiman, R.J., H. Decamps, and M.C. McClain. Riparia. Academic Press, San Diego.

2004

  1. Cardille, J. A., Coe, M. T., and J. A. Vano. 2004. Impacts of climate variation and catchment area on water balance and lake hydrologic type in groundwater-dominated systems: a generic lake model. Earth Interactions 8(13): 1-24.
  2. Hanson P. C., A. I. Pollard, D. L. Bade, K. Predick, S. R. Carpenter, and J.A. Foley. 2004. A model of carbon evasion and sedimentation in temperate lakes. Global Change Biology 10(8): 1285-1298.
  3. Kashian, D. M., D. B. Tinker, M. G. Turner and F. L. Scarpace.  2004. Spatial heterogeneity of lodgepole pine sapling densities following the 1988 fires in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 34 2263-2276.
  4. Miller, J. R., M. D. Dixon, and M. G. Turner. 2004. Response of avian communities in large-river floodplains to environmental variation at multiple scales. Ecological Applications 14:1394-1410.
  5. Miller, J. R., M. G. Turner, E. A. H. Smithwick, C. L. Dent and E.H. Stanley. 2004. Spatial extrapolation: the science of predicting ecological patterns and processes. BioScience 54:310-320.
  6. Palmer, M. A., E. S. Berhnhardt, E. A. Chornesky, S. L. Collins, A. P. Dobson, C. S. Duke, B. D. Gold, R. Jacobson, S. Kingsland, R. Kranz, M. J. Mappin, M. L. Martinez, F. Micheli, J. L. Morse, M. L. Pace, M. Pascual, S. Palumbi, O. J. Reichman, A. L. Simons, A. Townsend and M. G. Turner. 2004. Ecology for a crowded planet. Science 304:1251-1252.
  7. Romme W. H., and M. G. Turner. 2004. Ten years after the 1988 Yellowstone fires: is restoration needed? Pages 318-361 In: L. L. Wallace, editor.  After the fires: the ecology of change in Yellowstone National Park. Yale University Press, New Haven, Connecticut.
  8. Romme, W. H., M. G. Turner, D. B. Tinker and D. H. Knight. 2004. Emulating natural forest disturbances in the wildland-urban interface of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Pages 243-250 In: A. H. Perera, L. J. Buse and M. G. Weber, editors. Emulating natural forest landscape disturbances. Columbia University Press, New York.
  9. Schoennagel, T., D. M. Waller, M. G. Turner and W. H. Romme. 2004. The effect of fire interval on understory communities in Yellowstone National Park (USA). Journal of Vegetation Science 15:797-806.
  10. Turner, M. G., D. B. Tinker, W. H. Romme, D. M. Kashian and C. M. Litton. 2004. Landscape patterns of sapling density, leaf area, and aboveground net primary production in postfire lodgepole pine forests, Yellowstone National Park (USA). Ecosystems 7:751-775.
  11. Turner, M. G., S. E. Gergel, M. D. Dixon and J. R. Miller. 2004. Distribution and abundance of trees in floodplain forests of the Wisconsin River:  environmental influences at different scales.  Journal of Vegetation Science 15:729-738.
  12. Wallace, L. L., M. B. Coughenour, M. G. Turner and W. H. Romme. 2004. Fire patterns and ungulate survival in northern Yellowstone Park: the results of two separate models. Pages 299-317 in: L. L. Wallace, editor. After the fires: the ecology of change in Yellowstone National Park. Yale University Press, New Haven, Connecticut.

2003

  1. Boyce, M. S., J. S. Mao, E. H. Merrill, D. Fortin, M. G. Turner, J. Fryxell, and P. Turchin. 2003. Scale and heterogeneity in habitat selection by elk in Yellowstone National Park. EcoScience 10:421-431.
  2. Dixon, M. D. 2003. Effects of flow pattern on riparian seedling recruitment on sandbars in the Wisconsin River, Wisconsin, USA. Wetlands 23:125-139.
  3. Freeman, R. E., E. H. Stanley and M. G. Turner. 2003. Analysis and conservation implications of landscape change in the Wisconsin River floodplain, USA. Ecological Applications 13:416-431.
  4. Litton, C.M., Ryan, M.G., Tinker, D.B., and Knight, D.H. 2003. Belowground and aboveground biomass in young postfire lodgepole pine forests of contrasting tree density. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 33:351-363.
  5. Maxwell, T., J. Berkson, T. Schoennagel, K. Poiani, R. Constanza. 2003. Science, management and education investments. In, V.D. Dale (ed), Ecological modeling for resource management. Springer-Verlag: New York.
  6. Schoennagel, T., M. G. Turner and W. H. Romme. 2003.  The influence of fire interval and serotiny on postfire lodgepole pine density in Yellowstone National Park. Ecology 84:1967-1978. (pdf)
  7. Turner, M.G. 2003. Modeling for synthesis and integration: forests, people, and riparian coarse woody debris. Pp. 83-110 In: Canham, C.D., J.J. Cole, and W.K. Lauenroth, editors. Models in Ecosystem Science. Princeton (NJ): Princeton University Press.
  8. Turner, M. G., S. Collins, A. Lugo, J. Magnuson, S. Rupp and F. Swanson. 2003. Long-term ecological research on disturbance and ecological response. BioScience 53:46-56.
  9. Turner, M. G., S. M. Pearson, P. Bolstad and D. N. Wear. 2003. Effects of land-cover change on spaial pattern of forest communities in the Southern Appalachian Mountains (USA). Landscape Ecology 18:449-464.
  10. Turner, M. G., W. H. Romme and D. B. Tinker. 2003. Surprises and lessons from the 1988 Yellowstone fires. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 1(7):351-358.
  11. Turner, M. G., W. H. Romme, R. A. Reed and G. A. Tuskan. 2003. Postfire aspen seedling recruitment across the Yellowstone (USA) landscape. Landscape Ecology 18: 127-140.

2002

  1. Burgi, M. and M. G. Turner. 2002. Factors and processes shaping land cover and land cover changes along the Wisconsin River, USA. Ecosystems 5:184-201.
  2. Cardille, J.A. and M. G. Turner. 2002. Understanding landscape metrics. Pages 85-100 In: S. E. Gergel and M. G. Turner, editors. Learning landscape ecology: a practical guide to concepts and techniques. Springer-Verlag, New York.
  3. Dixon, M. D., M. G. Turner and C. Jin. 2002. Riparian tree seedling distribution on Wisconsin River sandbars: controls at different spatial scales. Ecological Monographs 72:465-485.
  4. Gergel, S.E. 2002. Assessing cumulative impacts of levees and dams on floodplain ponds: a neutral terrain model approach. Ecological Applications 12(6):1740-1754.
  5. Gergel, S. E., M. D. Dixon and M. G. Turner. 2002. Consequences of human-altered floods: levees, floods and floodplain forests along the Wisconsin River. Ecological Applications 12:1755-1770.
  6. Gergel, S. E., M. G. Turner and D. J. Mladenoff. 2002. Collecting spatial data at broad scales. Pages 9-16 In: S. E. Gergel and M. G. Turner, editors.  Learning landscape ecology: a practical guide to concepts and techniques. Springer-Verlag, New York.
  7. Gergel, S. E., M. G. Turner, J. R. Miller, J. M. Melack and E. H. Stanley. 2002. Landscape indicators of human impacts to river-floodplain systems. Aquatic Sciences 64:118-128.
  8. Greenburg, J., S. E. Gergel, and M. G. Turner. 2002. Effects of changes in scale and classification scheme on landscape metrics. Pages 101-111 In: S. E. Gergel and M. G. Turner, editors. Learning landscape ecology: a practical guide to concepts and techniques. Springer-Verlag, New York.
  9. Mitchell, C. E., M. G. Turner and S. M. Pearson. 2002. Effects of historical land use and forest patch size on myrmecochores and ant communities. Ecological Applications 12:1364-1377.
  10. Schnaiberg, J., J. Riera, M. G. Turner and P. R.Voss. 2002. Explaining human settlement patterns in a recreational lake district: Vilas County, Wisconsin, USA. Environmental Management 30:24-34.
  11. Smith, M. A., M. G. Turner and D. H. Rusch. 2002. The effect of military training activity on eastern lupine and the Karner blue butterfly on Fort McCoy, Wisconsin. Environmental Management 29: 102-115.
  12. Turner, M. G., D. B. Tinker, S. E. Gergel and F. S. Chapin, III. 2002. Landscape disturbance: location, pattern and dynamics. Pages 147-165 In: S. E. Gergel and M. G. Turner, editors. Learning landscape ecology: a practical guide to concepts and techniques. Springer-Verlag, New York.
  13. Turner, M. G., T. R. Crow, J. Liu, D. Rabe, C. F. Rabeni, P. A. Soranno, W. W. Taylor, K. A. Vogt, and J. A. Wiens. 2002. Bridging the gap between landscape ecology and natural resource management. Pages 433-460 in Liu, J. and W. Taylor, editors. Integrating landscape ecology into natural resource management. Cambridge University Press.

2001

  1. Cardille, J. A., S. J. Ventura and M. G. Turner. 2001. Environmental and social factors influencing wildfires in the upper Midwest, USA. Ecological Applications 11:111-127.
  2. Dale, V. H., S. Brown, R. A. Haeuber, N. T. Hobbs, N. J. Huntly, R. J. Naiman, W. E. Riebsame, M. G. Turner and T. J. Valone. 2001. Ecological guidelines for land use and management. Pages 3-36 In: V. H. Dale and R. A. Haeuber, editors. Applying ecological principles to land management. Springer-Verlag, New York.
  3. Erwin, E. E., M. G. Turner, R. L. Lindroth and W. H. Romme. 2001. Secondary plant compounds in seedling and mature aspen in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. American Midland Naturalist 145:299-308.
  4. Riera, J., P. R. Voss, S. R. Carpenter, T. K. Kratz, T. M. Lillesand, J. A. Schnaiberg, M. G. Turner, and M. W. Wegener. 2001. Nature, society and history in two contrasting landscapes in Wisconsin, USA: interactions between lakes and humans during the 20th century. Land Use Policy 18:41-51.

2000

  1. Dale, V. H., S. Brown, R. Haeuber, N. T. Hobbs, N. Huntly, R. J. Naiman, W. E. Riebsame, M. G. Turner, and T. Valone. 2000. Ecological principles and guidelines for managing the use of land. Ecological Applications 10:639-670.
  2. Hargrove, W. W., R. H. Gardner, M. G. Turner, W. H. Romme and D. G. Despain. 2000. Simulating fire patterns in heterogeneous landscapes. Ecological Modelling 135:243-263.
  3. Naiman, R. J. and M. G. Turner. 2000. A future perspective on North America’s freshwater ecosystems. Ecological Applications 10:958-970.

1999

  1. Gardner, R. H., W. H. Romme, and M. G. Turner. 1999. Predicting forest fire effects at landscape scales. Pages 163-185 In: D. J. Mladenoff and W. L. Baker, eds. Spatial modeling of forest ecosystems. Cambridge University Press, New York.
  2. Gergel, S. E., M. G. Turner, and T. K. Kratz. 1999. Dissolved organic carbon as an indicator of the scale of watershed influence on lakes and rivers.  Ecological Applications 9:1377-1390.
  3. Pearson, S. M., M. G. Turner, and J. B. Drake. 1999. Landscape change and habitat availability in the Southern Appalachian Highlands and the Olympic Peninsula. Ecological Applications 9:1288-1304.
  4. Pearson, S. M., M. G. Turner, and D. L. Urban. 1999. Effective exercises in teaching landscape ecology. Pages 335-368 in: J. M. Klopatek and R. H. Gardner, editors. Landscape ecological analysis. Springer-Verlag, New York.
  5. Reed, R. A., M. E. Finley, W. H. Romme, and M. G. Turner. 1999. Aboveground net primary production and leaf area index in initial postfire vegetation communities in Yellowstone National Park. Ecosystems 2:88-94.
  6. Spies, T. P., and M. G. Turner. 1999. Dynamic forest mosaics. Pages 95-160 In: M. L. Hunter, Jr., editor. Maintaining biodiversity in forest ecosystems. Cambridge University Press, New York.
  7. Stevens, M. T., M. G. Turner, G. A. Tuskan, W. H. Romme, and D. M. Waller. 1999. Genetic variation in postfire aspen seedlings in Yellowstone National Park. Molecular Ecology 8:1769-1780.
  8. Turner, M. G., W. H. Romme, and R. H. Gardner. 1999. Prefire heterogeneity, fire severity and plant reestablishment in subalpine forests of Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. International Journal of Wildland Fire 9:21-36.

1998

  1. Ives, A. R., M. G. Turner, and S. M. Pearson. 1998. Local explanations of landscape patterns: can analytical approaches approximate simulation models of spatial processes? Ecosystems 1:35-51.
  2. Meisel, J. E. and M. G. Turner. 1998. Scale detection in real and artificial landscapes using semivariance analysis. Landscape Ecology 13:347-362.
  3. Naiman, R. J., P. A. Bisson, R. G. Lee, and M. G. Turner. 1998. Watershed management. Pages 642-661 in: R. J. Naiman and R. E. Bilby, eds. River ecology and management. Springer-Verlag, New York.
  4. Pearson, S. M., A. B. Smith, and M. G. Turner. 1998. Forest fragmentation, land use, and cove-forest herbs in the French Broad River Basin. Castanea 63:382-395.
  5. Turner, M. G. 1998. Landscape ecology. Pages 77-122 In: S. I. Dodson, editor. Ecology. Oxford University Press, New York.
  6. Turner, M. G., and V. H. Dale. 1998. Comparing large, infrequent disturbances: what have we learned? Introduction for special feature. Ecosystems 1:493-496.
  7. Turner, M. G., S. R. Carpenter, E. J. Gustafson, R. J. Naiman, and S. M. Pearson. 1998. Land use. Pages 37-61 In: M. J. Mac, P. A. Opler, P. Doran, and C. Haecker, editors. Status and trends of our nation’s biological resources. Volume1. National Biological Service, Washington, D.C.
  8. Turner, M. G., W. L. Baker, C. Peterson, and R. K. Peet. 1998. Factors influencing succession: lessons from large, infrequent natural disturbances.  Ecosystems 1:511-523.
  9. Wear, D. N., M. G. Turner, and R. J. Naiman. 1998. Land cover along an urban-rural gradient: implications for water quality. Ecological Applications 8:619-630.

1997

  1. Magnuson, J. J., T. K. Kratz, T. F. Allen, D. E. Armstrong, B. J. Benson, C. J. Bowser, D. W. Bolgrien, S. R. Carpenter, T. M. Frost, S. T. Gower, T. M. Lillesand, J. A. Pike, and M. G. Turner. 1997. Regionalization of long-term ecological research (LTER) on north temperate lakes. Verh. Internat. Verein. Limnol. 26:522-528.
  2. Naiman, R. J., P. A. Bisson, R. G. Lee and M. G. Turner. 1997. Approaches to management at the watershed scale. Pages 239-254 in: K. A. Kohm and J. F. Franklin, editor. Creating a forestry for the 21st century. Island Press, Washington, DC.
  3. Romme, W. H., M. G. Turner, R. H. Gardner, W. W. Hargrove, G. A. Tuskan, D. G. Despain and R. A. Renkin. 1997. A rare episode of sexual reproduction in aspen (Populus tremuloides) following the 1988 Yellowstone fires. Natural Areas Journal 17:17-25.
  4. Turner, M. G., S. M. Pearson, W. H. Romme, and L. L. Wallace. 1997. Landscape heterogeneity and ungulate dynamics: what spatial scales are important?  Pages 331-348 In:  J. A. Bissonette, editor.  Wildlife and landscape ecology. Springer-Verlag, New York.
  5. Turner, M. G., V. H. Dale, and E. E. Everham, III. 1997. Fires, hurricanes and volcanoes: comparing large-scale disturbances. BioScience 47:758-768.
  6. Turner, M. G., W. H. Romme, R. H. Gardner and W. W. Hargrove. 1997. Effects of fire size and pattern on early succession in Yellowstone National Park. Ecological Monographs 67:411-433.
  7. With, K. A., R. H. Gardner, and M. G. Turner. 1997. Landscape connectivity and population distributions in heterogeneous environments. Oikos 78:151-169.

1996

  1. Christensen, N. L., Ann M. Bartuska, J. H. Brown, S. R. Carpenter, C. D’Antonio, R. Francis, J. F. Franklin, J. A. MacMahon, R. F. Noss, D. J. Parsons, C. H. Peterson, M. G. Turner, R. G. Woodmansee. 1996. The scientific basis for ecosystem management. Ecological Applications 6:665-691.
  2. Gardner, R. H., W. W. Hargrove, M. G. Turner, and W. H. Romme. 1996. Climate change, disturbances and landscape dynamics. Pages 149-172 In: B. Walker and W. Steffen, editors. Global change and terrestrial ecosystems. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK.
  3. Pearson, S. M., M. G. Turner, R. H. Gardner and R. V. O’Neill. 1996. An organism-based perspective of habitat fragmentation. Pages 77-95 In R. C. Szaro, ed. Biodiversity in managed landscapes: theory and practice. Oxford University Press, Covelo, California.
  4. Turner, M. G., D. N. Wear and R. O. Flamm. 1996. Land ownership and land-cover change in the Southern Appalachian Highlands and the Olympic Penninsula. Ecological Applications 6:1150-1172.
  5. Tuskan, G.A., K.E. Francis, S.L. Russ, W.H. Romme, and M. G. Turner. 1996. RAPD markers reveal diversity within and among clonal and seedling stands of aspen in Yellowstone National Park, U.S.A. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 26:2088-2098.
  6. Wear, D. N., M. G. Turner and R. O. Flamm. 1996. Ecosystem management with multiple owners: landscape dynamics in a Southern Appalachian watershed. Ecological Applications 6:1173-1188.
  7. Wu, Y., M. G. Turner, L. L. Wallace, and W. H. Romme. 1996. Elk survival following the 1988 fires in Yellowstone National Park: A simulation experiment. Natural Areas Journal 16:198-207.

1995

  1. O’Neill, R. H., C. T. Hunsaker, D. Jones, J. M. Klopatek, V. H. Dale, M. G. Turner, R. H. Gardner, and R. L. Graham. 1995. Sustainability at landscape and regional scales. Pages 137-143 in M. Munasinghe and W. Shearer, editors. Defining and measuring sustainability. The World Bank, Washington, DC.
  2. Pearson, S. M., M. G. Turner, L. L. Wallace and W. H. Romme. 1995. Winter habitat use by large ungulates following fires in northern Yellowstone National Park. Ecological Applications 5:744-755.
  3. Romme, W. H., M. G. Turner, L. L. Wallace and J. Walker. 1995. Aspen, elk and fire in northern Yellowstone National Park. Ecology 76:2097-2106.
  4. Turner, M. G. and R. V. O’Neill. 1995. Exploring aggregation in space and time. Pages 194-208 In C. G. Jones and J. H. Lawton, editors. Linking Species and Ecosystems. Chapman and Hall, New York.
  5. Turner, M. G., G. J. Arthaud, R. T. Engstrom, S. J. Hejl, J. Liu, S. Loeb and K. McKelvey. 1995. Usefulness of spatially explicit animal models in land management. Ecological Applications 5:12-16.
  6. Turner, M. G., R. H. Gardner and R. V. O’Neill. 1995. Ecological dynamics at broad scales. BioScience: Supplement S-29 to S-35.
  7. Wallace, L. L., M. G. Turner, W. H. Romme, R. V. O’Neill and Y. Wu. 1995. Scale of heterogeneity of forage production and winter foraging by elk and bison. Landscape Ecology 10:75-83.

1994

  1. Flamm, R. O. and M. G. Turner. 1994. Alternative model formulations of a stochastic model of landscape change. Landscape Ecology 9:37-46.
  2. Flamm, R. O. and M. G. Turner. 1994. Multidisciplinary modeling and GIS for landscape management. Pages 201-212 In: V. A. Sample, editor. Forest Ecosystem Management at the Landscape Level: The Role of Remote Sensing and Integrated GIS in Resource Management Planning, Analysis and Decision Making. Island Press.
  3. Tinker, D. B., W. H. Romme, W. W. Hargrove, R. H. Gardner and M. G. Turner. 1994. Landscape-scale heterogeneity in lodgepole pine serotiny. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 24:897-303.
  4. Turner, M. G. and W. H. Romme. 1994. Landscape dynamics in crown fire ecosystems. Landscape Ecology 9:59-77.
  5. Turner, M. G., W. H. Hargrove, R. H. Gardner and W. H. Romme. 1994. Effects of fire on landscape heterogeneity in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. Journal of Vegetation Science 5:731-742.
  6. Turner, M. G., W. H. Romme and R. H. Gardner. 1994. Landscape disturbance models and the long-term dynamics of natural areas. Natural Areas Journal 14:3-11.
  7. Turner, M. G., Y. Wu, W. H. Romme, L. L. Wallace and A. Brenkert. 1994. Simulating winter interactions between ungulates, vegetation and fire in northern Yellowstone Park. Ecological Applications 4:472-496.

1993

  1. Gardner, R. H., R. V. O’Neill and M. G. Turner. 1993. Ecological implications of landscape fragmentation. Pages 208-226 In S. T. A. Pickett and M. J. McDonnell, eds. Humans as components of ecosystems: subtle human effects and the ecology of populated areas. Springer-Verlag, New York.
  2. Hunsaker, C. T., R. A. Nisbet, D. Lam, J. A. Browder, M. G. Turner, W. L. Baker and D. B. Botkin. 1993. Spatial models of ecological systems and processes: the role of GIS. Pages 248-264 In: M. F. Goodchild, B. O. Parks and L. T. Steyaert, eds. Environmental Modeling with GIS. Oxford University Press, New York.
  3. Turner, M. G., R. V. O’Neill, R. H. Gardner and S. M. Pearson. 1993. Multiscale organization of landscape heterogeneity. Pages 81-87 in: M. E. Jensen and P. S. Bourgeron, eds. Eastside Forest Ecosystem Health Report, Volume II. Ecosystem management: principles and applications. U. S. Department of Agriculture, National Forest System, Forest Service Research, Washington, DC.
  4. Turner, M. G., W. H. Romme, R. H. Gardner, R. V. O’Neill, and T. K. Kratz. 1993. A revised concept of landscape equilibrium: disturbance and stability on scaled landscapes. Landscape Ecology 8:213-227.
  5. Turner, M. G., Y. Wu., W. H. Romme and L. L. Wallace. 1993. A landscape simulation model of winter foraging by large ungulates. Ecological Modelling 69:163-184.
  6. Wallace, L. L., M. G. Turner, W. H. Romme and Y. Wu. 1993. Bison and fire: landscape analysis of ungulate response to Yellowstone’s fires. Pages 79-92 in: Proceedings of the North American Public Bison Herds Symposium, LaCrosse, WI, July 27, 1993.

1992

  1. Lee, R. G., R. O. Flamm, M. G. Turner, C. Bledsoe, P. Chandler, C. DeFerrari, R. Gottfried, R. J. Naiman, N. Schumaker, and D. Wear. 1992. Integrating sustainable development and environmental vitality. Pp. 499-521 In R. J. Naiman, ed. New Perspectives in Watershed Management. Springer-Verlag, New York.
  2. Milne, B. T., M. G. Turner, J. A. Wiens and A. R. Johnson. 1992. Interactions between the fractal geometry of landscapes and allometric herbivory. Theoretical Population Biology 41:337-353.
  3. O’Neill, R. V., R. H. Gardner and M. G. Turner. 1992. A hierarchical neutral model for landscape analysis. Landscape Ecology 7:55-62.
  4. O’Neill, R. V., R. H. Gardner, M. G. Turner and W. H. Romme. 1992. Epidemiology theory and disturbance spread on landscapes. Landscape Ecology 7:19-26.

1991

  1. Gardner, R. H. and M. G. Turner. 1991. Future directions in quantitative landscape ecology. Pp. 519-525 In M. G. Turner and R. H. Gardner, eds. Quantitative methods in landscape ecology. Springer-Verlag, New York
  2. Gardner, R. H., M. G. Turner, R. V. O’Neill, and S. Lavorel. 1991. Simulation of the scale-dependent effects of landscape boundaries on species persistence and dispersal. Pp. 76-89 In M. M. Holland, P. G. Risser and R. J. Naiman, eds. Ecotones. The role of landscape boundaries in the management and restoration of changing environments. Chapman & Hall, New York.
  3. Gardner, R. H., V. H. Dale, R. V. O’Neill and M. G. Turner. 1992. A percolation model of ecological flows. Pp. 259-269 In A. J. Hansen and F. Di Castri, eds. Landscape Boundaries: Consequences for Biotic Diversity and Ecological Flow. Springer-Verlag, New York.
  4. O’Neill, R. V., R. H. Gardner, B. T. Milne, M. G. Turner, and B. Jackson. 1991. Heterogeneity and spatial hierarchies. Pp. 85-96 In J. Kolasa and S. T. A. Pickett, eds. Ecological Heterogeneity. Springer-Verlag, New York.
  5. Romme, W. H. and M. G. Turner. 1991. Implications of global climate change for Biogeographic Patterns in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.  Conservation Biology 5:373-386.
  6. Turner, M. G. and V. H. Dale. 1991. Modeling landscape disturbance. Pp. 323-351 In M. G. Turner and R. H. Gardner, eds. Quantitative methods in landscape ecology. Springer-Verlag, New York.
  7. Turner, M. G. and R. H. Gardner. 1991. Quantitative methods in landscape ecology: an introduction. Pp. 3-14 In M. G. Turner and R. H. Gardner, eds.  Quantitative methods in landscape ecology. Springer-Verlag, New York.
  8. Turner, M. G., R. H. Gardner and R. V. O’Neill. 1991. Potential responses of landscape boundaries to global climate change. Pp. 52-75 In M. M. Holland, P. G. Risser and R. J. Naiman, eds. Ecotones. The role of landscape boundaries in the management and restoration of changing environments. Chapman & Hall, New York.

1990

  1. Graham, R. L., M. G. Turner, and V. H. Dale. 1990. How increasing atmospheric CO2 and climate change affect forests. BioScience 40:575-587.
  2. Odum, E. P. and M. G. Turner. 1990. The Georgia landscape: a changing resource. Pp. 137 – 164 In I. S. Zonneveld and R. T. T. Forman, editors. Changing landscapes: an ecological perspective. Springer-Verlag, New York
  3. Turner, M. G. 1990. Landscape changes in nine rural counties in Georgia, USA. Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing 56:379-386.
  4. Turner, M. G. 1990. Spatial and temporal analysis of landscape patterns. Landscape Ecology 4:21-30.

1989

  1. Gardner, R. H., R. V. O’Neill, M. G. Turner and V. H. Dale. 1989. Quantifying scale-dependent effects of animal movement with simple percolation models. Landscape Ecology 3:217-227.
  2. Graham, R. L., M. G. Turner and V. H. Dale. 1989. CO2-Induced climate change and forest resources. Pp. 233-241 In: R. D. Noble, J. L. Martin and K. F. Jensen, eds. Air Pollution Effects on Vegetation. USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station, Broomall, Pennsylvania.
  3. Turner, M. G. 1989. Landscape ecology: the effect of pattern on process. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics 20:171-197.
  4. Turner, M. G., R. Costanza and F. H. Sklar. 1989. Methods to evaluate the performance of spatial simulation models. Ecological Modelling 48:1-18.
  5. Turner, M. G., R. H. Gardner, V. H. Dale and R. V. O’Neill. 1989. Predicting the spread of disturbance across heterogeneous landscapes. Oikos 55:121-129.
  6. Turner, M. G., V. H. Dale and R. H. Gardner. 1989. Predicting across scales: theory development and testing. Landscape Ecology 3:245-252.
  7. Turner, M. G., R. V. O’Neill, R. H. Gardner and B. T. Milne. 1989. Effects of changing spatial scale on the analysis of landscape pattern. Landscape Ecology 3:153-162.

1988

  1. O’Neill, R. V., J. R. Krummel, R. H. Gardner, G. Sugihara, B. Jackson, D. L. DeAngelis, B. T. Milne, M. G. Turner, B. Zygmunt, S. Christensen, V. H. Dale and R. L Graham. 1988. Indices of landscape pattern. Landscape Ecology 1:153-162.
  2. O’Neill, R. G., B. T. Milne, M. G. Turner, and R. H. Gardner. 1988. Resource utilization scales and landscape pattern. Landscape Ecology 2:63-69.
  3. Turner, M. G. 1988. A spatial simulation model of land use changes in a piedmont county in Georgia. Applied Mathematics and Computation 27:39-51.
  4. Turner, M. G. 1988. Multiple disturbances in a Spartina alterniflora salt marsh: are they additive? Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club 115:196-202.
  5. Turner, M. G. 1988. Simulation and management implications of feral horse grazing, Cumberland Island, Georgia. Journal of Range Management 41:441-447.
  6. Turner, M. G. and C. L. Ruscher. 1988. Changes in landscape patterns in Georgia, USA. Landscape Ecology 1:241-251.
  7. Turner, M. G., E. P. Odum, R. Costanza, and T. M. Springer. 1988. Market and nonmarket values of the Georgia landscape. Environmental Management 12:209-217.
  8. Turner, M. G., R. H. Gardner, V. H. Dale and R. V. O’Neill. 1988. Landscape pattern and the spread of disturbance. Pp. 373-382 In M. Ruzicka, T. Hrnciarova, and L. Miklos, eds. Proc. VIIIth Intl. Symp. Probs. Landsc. Ecol. Res., Vol. 1. Institute of Experimental Biology and Ecology, CBES SAS, Bratislava, Czechoslovakia.

1987

  1. Gardner, R. H., B. T. Milne, M. G. Turner and R. V. O’Neill. 1987. Neutral models for the analysis of broad-scale landscape patterns. Landscape Ecology 1:19-28.
  2. Turner, M. G. 1987. Land use changes and net primary production in the Georgia, USA, landscape: 1935-1982. Environmental Management 11:237-247.
  3. Turner, M. G. 1987. Effects of grazing by feral horses, clipping, trampling, and burning on a Georgia salt marsh. Estuaries 10:54-60.
  4. Turner, M. G. 1987. Spatial simulation of landscape changes in Georgia: a comparison of 3 transition models. Landscape Ecology 1:29-36.
  5. Turner, M. G. and S. P. Bratton. 1987. Fire, grazing and the landscape heterogeneity of a Georgia barrier island. Pp. 85-101 In M. G. Turner, editor.  Landscape heterogeneity and disturbance. Springer-Verlag, New York.

1985

  1. Turner, M. G. 1985. National Ecological Research Area Systems. (Map, 1:7,500,000, color.) U. S. National Atlas, U.S. Geological Survey, Washington, D.C.

1984

  1. Gregg, W. P., Jr. and M. M. Goigel. 1984. Putting the biosphere reserve concept into practice: the United States’ experience. Pp. 460-484 In F. Dicastri, F. W. G. Baker and M. Hadley (editors.). Ecology in Practice. Part 1: Ecosystem Management. UNESCO, Paris, France.

1983

  1. Goigel, M. M. and S. P. Bratton. 1983. Exotics in the parks. National Parks 57:24-29.
  2. Turner, M. G. and W. P. Gregg, Jr. 1983. The status of science activities in United States biosphere reserves. Environmental Conservation 10:231-237.
  3. Turner, M. G. 1984. Habitat utilization by burros in Virgin Islands National Park. Journal of Wildlife Management 48:1461-1464.

Theses and dissertations

National research council publications

  • National Research Council. 1993. Setting priorities for land conservation. National Academy Press, Washington, DC.
  • National Research Council. 2000. Global change ecosystems research. National Academy Press, Washington, DC.
  • National Research Council. 2002. Ecological dynamics on Yellowstone’s northern range. National Academy Press, Washington, DC.

Commentaries and book reviews (not refereed)

General audience